Biological Control of Chickpea Wilt by the Use of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR)


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Biological Control of Chickpea Wilt by the Use of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR)

The PhD thesis titled Biological Control of Chickpea Wilt by the Use of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) was submitted by a scholar from University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. Following are the details of the thesis /dissertation:

Name of the scholar: Muhammad Inam-Ul-Haq
Gender: Male
Title of thesis: Biological Control of Chickpea Wilt by the Use of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR)
Subject: Pathology Plant
Supervisor: Dr. Riaz Ahmad Chohan
University: University of Agriculture, Faisalabad
University Category: Public
Year Published: 2000

Note: For details, contact the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan or University of Agriculture, Faisalabad.


Tags: HEC, PhD, Scholar, University, College, Research, Degree




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